Salvia Divinorum

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Description

Salvia divinorum is a potent psychedelic characterized by unique visionary experiences. It shows great potential for treating pain and addiction, as well as depression—whether in traditional Mazatec ceremonies or more clinical, Western settings. Many people have also found it useful for personal growth.

Salvia Divinorum is legal in South Africa.

The plant is a healer and teacher, please do proper research if planning to use the plant for medicinal purposes.

Useful Links:

The Ultimate Guide to Salvia Divinorum (Ska pastora, Herb of the Shepherdess, Hierba de María, Magic mint, Diviner’s sage, Sally-D)

 

You can place your cutting in water (distilled or rain water would be best) to allow it to recover from travel shock and to grow roots.

Spray the leaves with water as often as possible. Remove damaged or brown leaves if any.

Keep out of direct sunlight in an area with high light intensity.

Increase humidity with a plastic bag / grow tent / empty fish tank or any other method that will increase humidity.

Plant in soil when white roots appear and are about 1 cm in length.

or

Plant directly into a suitable pot for rooting. I use 8 cm square plastic pots. Fill the bottom with a layer of small stones or perlite to help with drainage and to provide air for the roots.

Soil mix: standard garden indoor potting soil with added perlite and bone-meal.

Make sure to water often and spray the leaves with water a few times a day.

Increase humidity with a plastic bag / grow tent / empty fish tank or any other method that will increase humidity, this will help to promote fast rooting.

Salvia Divinorum roots are very sensitive and does not like to be disturbed.

Once your plants has rooted, it will be ready to be transplanted to it’s final spot. This takes 3 -6 weeks depending on temperature, humidity and the amount of light for the plants to root properly.

 

 

 

Salvia divinorum in its natural environment in the mexican rain forests only receives 20 to 50% sunlight. The dense canopy of the rain forest filters this light at all times and the plants are never exposed to stronger light. They are fully adapted to these conditions and cannot cope well with light intensities much higher than 50%.

In the garden environment this can be provided by placing the plants under dense trees under 50% shade cloth. Established salvia plants will survive stronger exposure, but this will stifle growth and decrease leaf size.

Young salvias or salvia cutting are best kept under artificial lights. These should be cool white fluorescent tubes, as the heat emitted by HPS or halide bulbs is damaging to salvia. If these warm light sources are the only option, the plant should be placed at least 2 or 3 meters away from the bulb. Salvia prefers temperatures around 20deg C. It will withstand much higher temperatures (up to 48 degC), but only in very high humidity environments.

Temperatures below 10 degC will trigger dormancy. Salvias flowering cycle is induced by short photoperiods. When light hours fall below about 12 hours in autumn, vegetative growth will cease and flower poduction will proceed rapidly.

For continous growth under artificial light the hours should be kept above 16 at all times. It appears that salvia does not need a dark period and 24 hour continuous lighting resulted in increased leaf production.

Source: http://www.shaman-australis.com.au/knowledge-salvia-divinorum-propagation-and-care.html

Suggested Soil Mixture: standard garden indoor potting soil with added perlite and bone-meal.

Fertilizer: Seagrow. Make sure to ventilate when feeding to prevent leave burn from the gasses.

The rain forest soils of the natural habitat of Salvia divinorum are very fertile and rich in organic matter. Salvia generally chooses very damp or even wet places to grow and is frequently found along mountain creeks and gullies. The soils can be heavy or light but are always very rich.

Salvia responds well to high nutrient levels. Salvia is extremely sensitive to ammonia gas. This can be produced when manures or urea fertilisers are exposed to heat. A build up of these gases will kill the foliage of the plant and may do damage to the growth nodes. A good way to avoid this build up is to always provide some form of ventilation.

Source: http://www.shaman-australis.com.au/knowledge-salvia-divinorum-propagation-and-care.html

 

Salvia divnorum roots are sensitive, replant in your biggest pot available.

Suggested Soil Mixture: standard garden indoor potting soil with added perlite and bone-meal.